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2017 BMW R nineT Pure vs. Honda CB1100 EX Comparison Review | Absolutely Classic

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2017 BMW R nineT Pure vs. Honda CB1100 EX Comparison Review | Absolutely Classic

 

With all the excitement at the moment, when it is whipped on exotic motorcycles with electronic control, you can say a lot to return to simpler times and our purist roots. This brings us to our review of the comparison of the BMW R 9T Pure against the Honda CB1100 EX.

How about just riding a motorcycle at a basic level for pure visceral pleasure from it, and spending a little time to enjoy the open road? The old saying that having more fun on a slow bike faster than a fast bike, slowly has a lot of truth, especially on public roads.
In addition, bare motorcycles with all mechanical bits on the show tend to have a more attractive visual appeal than superbikes with plastic coating. Of the many cars that fit into the standard category, the 2017 BMW R 9T Pure and the Honda CB1100 EX fit perfectly into this designation.

The 2017 Honda CB1100 EX pulls from some landmark and much loved company heritage, and when traveling around the city, I admired the smiles and big fingers of car drivers. When you receive an evaluation from a non-motorcyclist community, you know that you have something special. Encouragingly, the CB1100 EX resonates with the young and old.

The more modern but heritage-oriented style of the 2017 roadster BMW R 9T Pure would not look out of place in the next Mad Max movie. Judging by the momentary banner success of the standard more decorated R 9T, when it debuted, I can safely say that the visual attractiveness of Pure is also very strong.

Both of these motorcycles seem to be truncated to the ground, with the intelligent use of modern technology and materials. However, a simple look can be; they just are not. EFI, ABS and some LED lights are standard for BMW and Honda. Modern materials and finishing are also a great leap over last year, and both bicycles can use modern radial rubber with a much more prominent imprint.

Although the old saying "Victory on Sunday, sale on Monday" has its place to create a brand, since buyers, to slavishly adhere to this, can leave many other potentially dangerous motorcycles in the cold. True, although it goes according to the specifications of the machine sheet can be a useful indicator of absolute performance, it can also be mislead if you are trying to assess the real potential of using a motorcycle.
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This is especially true for these two machines, and despite my comments, earlier on how fast to ride slow bicycles, make no mistake, none of these motorcycles in any way slow down. If you want to wrest them and enter a quick turn, they will gladly take it and leave you alone, as you might ask for more.

Only by specifications, Honda does not measure BMW in any field, so I'm tempted to assume that this comparison is likely to be more than unfair. For example, the four-cylinder CB1100 EX with air / oil cooling, apparently, takes about 85 horsepower in the Dunlop Sportmax Touring D205, while BMW repels more than 100 horses on the Metzeler Roadtec Z8 back. Keep in mind that the BMW air / oil-cooled twin on the Pure is not the last water-cooled boxer found in the new generation RT or GS models.

The curb weight with full heating is a similar story, in which Pure tilts the scales at 483 pounds, while the CB1100 is about 57 pounds of flogging.

In terms of suspension, BMW has an unregulated 43-mm conventional plug, as well as a non-contact shock with adjustable rebound damping and sprinter-preload. Nevertheless, Honda goes completely into the old school with a 41 mm fork and double impacts - at both ends there is a spring adjustment, but without adjusting the damping.

In addition, Honda again remains true to the story and comes with unusual 18-inch wheels and relatively narrow tires 110 and 140 mm, while BMW is equipped with typically modern 17-inch rims (steep wheels with a transverse back, which here are visible option $ 500 ) char a more chic combination of tires for wheels 120/180.

So, does Pure completely outperform the poor old slug CB1100 in all aspects? Well, not so fast, because in fact it is not.

Honda does nothing, except BMW, which is a pretty sporting animal. Of course, this is a typical Honda - a beautifully designed pearl of street sleepers, which does everything very well. However, the CB1100 EX also completely exceeded my expectations in all areas; it was a quick, terrific delight.

Honda is incredibly easy to ride. While on paper it's pretty hard, in fact the CB1100 is perfectly balanced and carries its weight effortlessly. The specification sheet also says that it is not enough. However, the engine responds quickly and is ready for rev and never feels that it lacks power.
Despite the fact that the power plant CB1100 was built-4, it is also extremely round and produces a ton of power reduction. It is reduced by 8500 revolutions per minute, and at a speed of 70 miles per hour the engine with a low revolution turns only 3000 revolutions.

The CB1100 is very smooth, and you need quite a lot of screwing to extract Honda's performance. Dropping the hydraulic clutch off the line, Honda is not terribly bracing in the first gear, but from about 20 miles per hour the CB1100 EX will accelerate just as much as you ask for it - in no case did I find it at all.

The 1140cc engine is expected to be smooth, but not buzzy. Instead, he has that little mechanical low-frequency rumble that I remember from the past, and I find it very enjoyable. Anyone who traveled in the late 70s Honda will consciously smile when familiar sounds and feelings flood in - without any minor fads riding on the old bike.
The Honda motor is clearly aimed at those who do not need a screaming engine; and yet, if you decide to change it to increase it, the motor will deliver its energy nicely. I dare say it can be a pretty fast bike! Thus, Honda is fine to go at a modest pace, and if you get a touch of craziness and tie it through some twist or on the freeway on the ramp, the motor will gladly respond.

With its lighter overall weight and slightly more urgent fuel mapping, BMW is slightly more powerful than Honda. The boxer's double feels soft at low revs, but as the hoarse noise of this beautiful exhaust pipe takes on a more vital tone, when you twist the throttle harder, the motor jumps on the bike forward, like a thoroughbred leaving the gate to Kentucky.

BMW claims 110 horsepower at 7750 rpm, and it sounds right on the handle. He must lose more than motorcycles than Honda, lose his final transmission of the chain, so perhaps it's all the same.

Pure does not have a speed counter, so I can not quote the numbers, but, of course, at moderate speeds of 86 ft / lb of claimed torque, the bike jumps off difficult corners, no matter what shell you are in. straight line, Clean motor just purrs, as if he hardly rolled over. When you decide to turn it over, the engine gets a much stronger character. This bike is fun!

As remarkable as the BMW R 9T Pure to ride, the installation of a large capacity double in the longitudinal direction on the motorcycle chassis has its quirks. This includes a typical slight shudder when he stops at the lights and when he leaves. Having said this, moving, the engine is easily smoothed out.

In addition, with the slope of the throttle valve, an odd reaction of torque occurs, although during normal operation with the clutch the leading shaft drive rotates in the opposite direction of the crankshaft and basically reverses it.

The latest quirk for the R 9T Pure is a heavy, somewhat clunky gearbox. It is almost impossible to aimlessly switch without a violent explosion when you return to the throttle. Even using the clutch, I had to be very deliberate (slow) when shifting gears to try to keep everything. The best way to ride a BMW is to bring it to higher gear as soon as possible, and then use this wonderful powerband, using only the fifth and sixth gear, regardless of the speed that you are making.
On the contrary, the new six-speed gearbox CB1100 EX has perfect ratios and works great. This makes brainless permutations at high speed so smooth that the passenger will hardly say that you have changed the outfit.

Turning, motorcycles are similar. This is a surprise, given that the yield of the chassis and suspension Honda, apparently, in theory.

The BMW suspension is sturdy, but compatible, and the clean handle is pleasant, neutral. This is not the fastest turning bicycle I've driven, but the wide rudders allow you to quickly and predictably ride a bicycle, and once in the corner BMW remains seated in line. It's almost impossible to frustrate the middle of the chassis, because the suspension absorbs all impacts - I never felt the need to tune it. The ride is sturdy, but comfortable, and BMW drives very well.

As already mentioned, Honda is equipped with a "single" Showa fork 41 mm and double shock absorbers Showa, and everything is regulated only for spring preload. However, unlike the late 70s / early 80s, this bike pays homage, a twin-cylinder steel frame with a double contour and a tight pendulum have all the advantages of modern, powerful Honda technology.

This magic prevents all manipulation with the hinge in the middle, which was so well known in this era, and, yes, I then became well acquainted with it. This trouble is now completely transferred to the history books. The CB1100 EX is agile, but stable, with dense neutral processing. Thinner leg tires definitely help Honda to be so agile and reactive, but it never gets nervous - even in fast, unstable corners.

The suspension itself is absolutely ideal for this bike and my weight of 185 pounds. Fast or slow, and you can drive very hard on the CB1100 EX - the suspension is sturdy and very well damped. Honda has taken certain measures to ensure a decent turn in the corners. However, if you are really going to do it - and it's hard not to have serious fun in twist - then you can touch the tentacles on the foldable footpeg.

I definitely pushed the CB1100 EX and, even on bumpy corners, he did not shake the rudders with what is so familiar. Several times I had to change my line because of the rocks on the road - no problem, Honda obeyed, not objecting. Nothing upset the chassis and the bicycle, traversed in the corners, and perfectly kept his line.
Not radial brakes on both bikes work very well, and BMW uses 320 mm front rotors and four-piston calipers Brembo, and behind - 295 mm. Honda has smaller 296-mm double rotors in the front and four-piston calipers from Nissin with a rotor of 256 mm for the rear wheel.

The brakes of both cars are very powerful, have many feelings and perform as you would expect. However, Honda's brakes also have a pretty strong initial bite; experienced riders will appreciate the effectiveness of braking, while less experienced riders will quickly learn to be smooth when using a brake. Luckily, both of these bikes are equipped with full ABS.

The tires on these bicycles are radially belted, so relatively sticky, sporty tire joints are used that provide a decent grip for each tire with a summer tire. The tires of the BMW Metzeler Roadtec Z8 Interact feature good cross-country performance; I never had problems with the capture.

Honda is equipped with radial tires Dunlop Sportmax Touring D205, and they are excellent, despite the name, which indicates a long service life. Despite the fact that the Dunlops are relatively skinny for today, I always snapped, even when I made a strong push through 80+ miles per hour. As in all Dunlops, they provide neutral, constant processing on all inclined corners and give a lot of feedback from the road surface.

Ergonomically, BMW is slightly more aggressive than Honda, although both motorcycles have very natural riding positions. The Pure seat is skilfully designed to look minimalistic, but surprisingly comfortable. The riding position is slightly more "top" on the BMW, while Honda is more conventional, and I found that my knees are well mounted on the jagged sides of this gorgeous seamless gas tank.

BMW is more inclined forward, and a wide flat handle makes slightly sporty ethics, while Honda's position is much more relaxed, and the rider is almost completely vertical.

The CB1000 EX has middle control pedals that are farther ahead than BMW's half-reactors, and the Honda's steering wheel is high and pulled back. Honda can be called almost like a cruiser. Its comfortable ergos, friendly character and a deeply laid retro seat would not be out of place in the American V-twin landscape, so I'm tempted to call the CB1100 EX a "gentleman cruiser". However, make no mistake - if you live near twists and you want to explore the sports side of the Honda personality, then by adapting the flatter European-style steering wheel, you will not compromise the comfort of the bike, while encouraging you to seriously engage in fun.

These two motorcycles, priced at around $ 12,000, are not budget machines, but they are also not too expensive. The price of BMW may slightly increase depending on the options that you add, and certainly there are some very cool accessories to emphasize the look. No matter how you cut it, it's a very well designed, perfectly finished machine, and it's not particularly cheap.
Despite the fact that both these motorcycles come to purist, retro ideas from completely different points of view, use modern technology and engineering technologies. They are both incredibly enjoyable to ride, and I was constantly smiling, rolling on each of them.

Although they are not sports bikes, if you feel the need for speed, then each of them has a sporting side by nature - you can strongly push on one of these motorcycles and they will react more than willingly. They both have great opportunities, and there are no shortcomings.

So forget about the specifications, forget about gizgets and gadgets - or lack thereof - it's clean (no puns) a nice motorcycle at best, and these two bikes should be judged one at a time.

Ultimately, the choice simply comes down to the approach - do you want in your garage the modern retro-BWM R-nine Pure or the classic retro Honda CB1100 EX? Regardless of your preferences, you will not be disappointed by any of them. Of course, Honda can be so agile and reactive, but it never gets nervous - even in fast, unstable corners.

The suspension itself is absolutely ideal for this bike and my weight of 185 pounds. Fast or slow, and you can drive very hard on the CB1100 EX - the suspension is sturdy and very well damped. Honda has taken certain measures to ensure a decent turn in the corners. Nevertheless, if you are really going to do it - and it's hard not to have serious pleasure in twist - then you can touch the tentacles on the foldable footpeg.
Riding style:

Helmet: Shoei X-14
Jacket: Cortech GX Sport Air 4
Gloves: Racer Mickey
Jeans: Spidi J & K Pro Tex
Footwear: Sidi Doha
Photo by Don Williams

15 Main characteristicsBMW R nineT PureHonda CB1100 EX
EngineHorizontally against twinInline-4
Displacement1170cc1140cc
Diameter of hole x x101mm x 73mm73.5 x 67.2mm
Valve train DOHCDOHC
Cooling oils and oils
Front tire 120/70 x 17; Metzeler Roadtec Z8 Interact110 / 80 x 18; Dunlop Sportmax Touring D205F
The rear tires are 180/55 x 17; Metzeler Roadtec Z8 Interact140 / 70 x 18; Dunlop Sportmax Touring D205
Front brakes320 mm discs with 4-piston calipers296mm discs with 4-piston calipers
Wheelbase58.8 inches58.7 inches
Rake27 degrees27 degrees
Trail4.6 inches4.4 inches
Seat height 31.7 inches 31.2 inches
Fuel capacity4,5 gallons4,4 gallons
Curb weight483 lb. 540 lb.
Price $ 11,995 MSRP ($ 12,495 as checked) $ 12,199 MSRP
 

2017 BMW R nineT Pure vs. Honda CB1100 EX Comparison Review | Absolutely Classic

 

2017 BMW R nineT Pure vs. Honda CB1100 EX Comparison Review | Absolutely Classic

 

2017 BMW R nineT Pure vs. Honda CB1100 EX Comparison Review | Absolutely Classic

 

2017 BMW R nineT Pure vs. Honda CB1100 EX Comparison Review | Absolutely Classic

 

2017 BMW R nineT Pure vs. Honda CB1100 EX Comparison Review | Absolutely Classic

 

2017 BMW R nineT Pure vs. Honda CB1100 EX Comparison Review | Absolutely Classic

 




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